What are good approaches to start learning Chinese after learning Japanese language?

Updated 3 days ago in Learn Chinese
8 on May 19, 2014

My Japanese was quite good when I was in college. Now I`d like to learn Chinese.

 
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0 on May 19, 2014

If you’re learning both Japanese and Chinese language, you would have noticed that some kanji, even though they are of Chinese origin, they have been made easy or even digress from the original vocabulary and are now using a different version of the same character

ki 気 (Japanese) {qì} 气 (simplified) 氣 (traditional)

{zasshi} 雑誌 (Japanese) {zázhì} 杂志 (simplified) 雜志 or 雜誌 (traditional)

{ongaku} 音楽 (Japanese) {yīnyuè} 音乐 (simplified) 音樂 (traditional)

The first character in the Japanese {mainichi}毎日 is not the same way in Chinese 每天.

Unlike Japanese, Chinese characters ordinarily have only one reading, perhaps 3rd or 4th of these have two readings (usually sound similar or different only by their tone), and only few have three or more.

The phonetic aspect of a character of Chinese language is useful for learning it (especially with simplified characters), compared to Japanese, where it’s simply a traditional foot note. Characters that look identical usually sound alike, and it’s not common to be able to guess the unique reading of an unknown character (if not the tone) by its structure. Therefore learning characters in Chinese is much easier compared to Japanese.

 

Similarities between English and Chinese grammar are shallow when compared to the numerous similarities between Japanese and Chinese. You would not be lacking anything by studying Japanese instead of English.

 

However, you should not shun English completely, mainly because reference materials are widely available in English. Check out the amazing Pleco dictionary suite, available on various platforms (I use it on iOS). For Japanese, the Shogakukan 中日日中辞典 app for iOS is recommended but a bit costly; you can also consider the BitEx and Horry app.

Having both Japanese and English under your belt is an advantage.

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0 on March 25, 2016

Depends really on your level, aims and how you like to study. Typically, for beginners, it’s a good idea to be in a group class, as the social environment makes it easier to study and more fun while you are making your first steps. For more intermediate-advanced students who are already able to express themselves and their thoughts, doing a 1on1 program is quite a good idea as you can discuss more topics and really practice your spoken Chinese with the sole attention of the teacher on you.

For a good place to study Mandarin, in my opinion, Hanbridge Mandarin School is among the best options out there. It offers experienced and professional teachers who specifically studied Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language (对外汉语) and have vast experience. The teachers are full time employees of the school, so having good conditions, they stay for longer. Note though that with quality, comes price, so it is not the cheapest school out there.

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0 on May 21, 2021

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0 on June 10, 2021

Hi,

Degree proficiency means that an individual has language abilities and they’re able to communicate or react to both Japanese greetings and words. This kind of proficiency can come handy in jobs that demand basic interaction with all people in the speech such as in the tourism industry. This amount assumes that the disciple would understand 100 kanji and approximately 800 words of the language. Japanese language classes in Pune and skills and he/she can communicate fluently in the language while level supposes that an individual has advanced. N1 level expects the disciple to understand at least 10,000 words in the language and 2000 amount of Kanji. Such profiles would require a person to speak or write in Japanese in time with the utmost amount of accuracy and a JLPT certification of N1 level tests and guarantees the exact same.

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0 on July 29, 2021

I studied Japanese a bit, but then switched to Chinese. I learn not only Chinese, but also a lot about Chinese culture and customs. It takes a lot of time and effort, so I don’t have time to do all the tasks in college. A friend of mine, who is also learning Chinese, recommended me https://phdessay.com/free-essays-on/courage/ to write various essays and other school assignments with the help of professional writers. This allowed me to save time in my studies and dedicate it to my own self-development and language learning + there is a lot of interesting material that can be read not to prepare for college.

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0 on August 4, 2021

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0 on August 31, 2021

For those who have a strong interest in Eastern culture and a willingness to make a long-term commitment, they can start by learning the most important character. That is, they should learn to read and write both hanzi and kanji. For those who are more interested in the Chinese language but don’t want to make such an investment in time, they can opt for some form of simplified writing. For those who are only looking for some knowledge on how to speak or understand basic sentences or phrases in Mandarin, they can choose to learn pinyin.

The most important thing to know is that Japanese and Chinese languages are very different linguistically. Japanese is an agglutinative language, but Chinese is not. Japanese has no tenses, whereas Chinese does. That being said, the following are some of the most common approaches to start learning Chinese after learning Japanese:

 

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0 3 days ago

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